DriBuddi: Is It Any Good and Should I Get One? (PART 3)
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DriBuddi: Is It Any Good and Should I Get One? (PART 3)

Some versions of this concept, like this Genesis Dryfast, also has small little bars to hang your socks and small items. The owner of this unit in the photo below however was also not really in much awe of the product. She claims the clothes stink from being too shut in under the cover, and advises that the cover be opened a bit to get better ventilation when in use.

This discussion is continued from here...

Two other aspects I believe the designers had to deal with that gummed up the works, is energy sufficiency and time. The unit has a maximum 3 hour timer on it. I simply don't know why this is, because for a load containing normal clothes (not just the thinnest, lightest women's tops or panties), it simply needs a lot more time. Honestly, to have clothes dried completely, in my experience the unit requires a minimum of 8 hours (assuming the clothes are hung spread out well and you don't have items made from extremely thick material having many layers pressing on top of each other when hung, for example really thick pants hung over a hanger where at the hanging bar of the hanger you have four layers or more meeting tightly).

Fortunately the timer dial can be turned the other way to have it on permanently, so that's good if you're not forgetful of which household items you left on. Best is to hang about 4 to 6 items of clothing loosely on hangers on the unit and let the unit dry them overnight (the manual leaflet states that the unit should not work for longer than 6 hours at a time, so I'm not sure how long mine is going to last working overnight.)

This I suppose kills the advertised claim of it being more energy sufficient than a conventional tumble dryer, which as you may know can dry a whole heavy load in one and a half to three hours. So don't really buy this unit for its "energy sufficiency" if you wear normal clothes like jeans, pants, shirts etc.

Personally I believe the DriBuddi is unfortunately sold for over three times the price it should be. They might be more popular if they were sold as fairly priced ordinary household equipment instead of being sold under the "TV products" banner. It's not bad, but I know a few people who bought it and nobody's really wowedly happy. The DriBuddi is very useful and you will indeed use it a lot if you're single and haven't that much clothes to wash at one time and you haven't a safe spot outside like a balcony or somewhere you can place a clothes rack and have the wind dry your clothes (for free!).

Some versions of this concept, like this Genesis Dryfast, also has small little bars to hang your socks and small items. The owner of this unit in the photo below however was also not really in much awe of the product. She claims the clothes stink from being too shut in under the cover, and advises that the cover be opened a bit to get better ventilation when in use.

In conclusion, though many will differ with me, I think these types of units will be better if they're bigger and actually have space inside them to hang a whole laundry load.  That might change the reviews you see online from people who bought a DriBuddi but still use their conventional tumble dryers anyway.  But of course many people simply don't have the space for such a large unit in their homes, so it's probably not going to happen on a consumer level.

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